The Mapmaker’s Children

  

The Mapmaker’s Children. Sarah McCoy. 336 pages. 2016. 

Disclaimer – I’m a total nut for historical fiction, HOWEVER, Sarah McCoy’s The Mapmaker’s Children was easily one of the most enjoyable books I’ve read in a long time. Whether or not historical fiction is your go-to genre, this book will prove to be an entertaining, intelligently written piece of literature. 

After years of research, McCoy masterfully paints the lives of two women separated by more than 150 years. Yet as the chapters alternate back and forth between the two characters, you’ll find yourself in excited anticipation of discovering how these two lives are connected. When talking with my reading buddies, I often hear people say they either love stories with multiple characters through shifting chapters or they hate them and find them difficult to follow. This couldn’t be farther from the truth in The Mapmaker’s Children. Both characters progress evenly through the novel and McCoy dictates their stories in such a calculated manner, you’ll never think twice about the characters’ stories alternating along. 

As I read more and more of the novel I found myself torn between wanting to finish the book in one sitting and not wanting to read more to avoid having the book ever reach its end. Needless to say, I’ve finished the book and my husband is probably already tired of hearing me complain about it being over. I guess I’ll just need to pick up all of Sarah McCoy’s other novels. 🙂

Have you read any of McCoy’s other works? If not, what are your favorite historical fiction novels that I should add to my “to read” list? I’d love to hear from you!

If you enjoyed this post you may want to check out some of the links below about The Mapmaker’s Children. 

I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review. 

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2 thoughts on “The Mapmaker’s Children”

  1. I’ve never heard of McCoy and I’ll admit to being one of those people who isn’t very fond of shifting perspectives, but the title alone makes me want to pick up this book!

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